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Monthly Archives: May 2011

How Redaction works for the Public Record (Recorders, Registers, Clerks, etc…)

At the state and local level, our elected officials are responsible to manage and make available Public Records. While doing this, they must be aware that some of these Public Records contain Private Information. Think about the volume of land related records your local county office deals with. Every transaction where a piece of land or property changes ownership, a voluminous collection of documentation follows. Title information, mortgage/loan information, historical information such as liens, court information and related documents all have some influence as to the disposition of any piece land or property.

Found within these numerous documents can be found varying types and amounts of Personal Identifying Information (PII) such as social security numbers, dates of birth, credit and bank card numbers, driver’s license numbers and etc. Now, add the additional complexity that web access to these documents is now de facto.  The voting public and private industry simply demand electronic information exchange.

More and more county and state offices are adopting electronic technology to manage their core business operations. Because of this, the inter/intra office, departmental and division communication is becoming more and more electronic based. Document sharing is no longer sending volumes of paper documents, but allowing access via an on-line computer application.

So how does a state/local official comply with current statutes and laws to provide open access to Public Records without exposing individual’s Personal Identifying Information (PII), especially via the web? And the question as to why they would not want to expose the PII should be rhetorical. Considering the current environment of identity theft we all exist within each day, information security is of paramount concern.

The answer is called Redaction:

Redaction is the process of covering over or blacking out specific information within a document. For hardcopy documents, this can be overwhelming task. Each time a person comes into a government office to research and gather information and makes copies of Public Information for personal or private use, the office has the risk that someone will walk out with someone else’s PII.

Or, when county offices receive record requests via snail mail, many offices today still deliver the information via hardcopy documents.

Example of legacy document hardcopy transaction:

  1. Original requested documents are located and photocopied;
  2. PII is redacted from photocopy using a marker of some type;
  3. The redacted copy is photocopied to eliminate the opportunity of bleed-through of original information;
  4. Original copy is re-filed, requested copy is mailed, and original photocopy is destroyed.

For day-forward electronic transactions:

Day-Forward Processing: Using an automated redaction software product

Documents can enter a local government office in a variety of ways;

  • Public Access software (E-Recording) (Simplifile, Ingeo, etc…)
  • Fax
  • Title Company
  • Gov-to-Gov interchange
  • Web Portal
  • Other

As each new document is received in an office:

  1. The document is scanned or received electronically;
  2. Workflow driven process pushes image through an automated redaction product;
  3. Image comes up for manual human review and verification;
  4. Redacted image is electronically copied, creating a “public, redacted” version;
  5. The image follows normal workflow process until final document is verified and made available for view;

The original, non-redacted image remains in-tact while the redacted version is made available for public access.

If you have legacy/historical documents that need to be redacted, you should check with your automated redaction software vendor to see what they suggest. If your legacy documents are still on paper or film, you will need to go through the exercise of digitizing these documents. See my posts on preparing for conversion projects for assistance.

If your documents are already digitized, then your vendor may be able to facilitate your office doing verification of the images they process through their automated redaction software. Your CAPEX would be minimized by doing the verification work in-house.

I would not suggest trying to process all of your legacy documents through an automated redaction software product in-house. Processing millions of images through redaction software is very processor heavy – your office would probably need to purchase expensive servers if you chose to do the entire project in-house.

Is Document Management Still a Viable Market?

Following the “glass half-empty” analogy, many have said that the document conversion and document management industry is nearing its end. “They” claim all the paper in the world has been scanned and every business has already purchased their fancy new EDMS (Electronic Document Management Software) and ECMS (Enterprise Content Management Software).

Well, not so fast. In a recent survey done by Eclipse Group, an international services firm providing document and content management solutions, they found that an alarming number of businesses and organizations today are still heavily reliant upon paper based business critical processes.

Key findings:

  • 75% of companies are still heavily reliant on paper based invoicing processes
  • 67% of respondents are currently sending the majority of their sales invoices by paper rather than electronically using a document management solution
  • 75% of respondents are currently sending the majority of their purchase invoices by paper rather than using a document management system
  • 83% currently have to re-type invoices received into their finance system

The survey, which includes the views of financial professionals from a variety of sectors including insurance, financial services, industrial and automotive, also found that 83% of respondents currently have to re-type invoices into their finance system upon receipt into the accounts departments rather than using a document management system, raising serious concerns over accuracy and efficiency.

Gary Waylett, CEO of Eclipse Group commented, “Given the efficient way most businesses are now able to share information, it is surprising to find so many finance departments are not using a document management solution and continue to re-key data between systems. In addition to duplicating effort, and hence adding cost, re-keying significantly adds the risk of errors which then complicates the reconciliation process.”

So take heart all of you software and services companies, business will be good for years to come.

Seven Steps Towards A Successful Document Conversion Project

The service of converting paper or microfilm documents to digital format is a commodity in the document conversion world. It seems that anyone can become a service bureau with an inexpensive scanner and rudimentary capture software. The problem is there is really so much more to scanning than meets the eye – and this doesn’t become apparent until you have paid someone to scan a million of your documents just to discover you can only access about 750,000 of them within your document management software. Oh, and this realization happens about a year after you have signed off on the project.
How will you ever know if the bureau actually scanned 100% of your images? How will you know if they delivered 100% of them to you? I was once part of a project where we had partnered with a service bureau to scan land records books from a major US county. During the process, the partner delivered 50,000 medical records images by mistake. Talk about a disaster – this is one of the worst I have ever experienced. Billing throughout the remainder of the project constant struggle. Delivery details such as which images and how many were never accurate. To help ensure a successful backfile project, include some type of pre-project checklist.

The following is a suggested minimum for this check-list:

  1. Pre-scan inventory
  2. Pilot process to establish image quality standards
  3. Indexing nomenclature and detail
  4. Error rating process (by image, record, index…)
  5. Batch delivery schedule including durations and volumes
  6. Reconciliation methodology to original inventory
  7. Review and error reporting process
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