SRIIA TECHNOLOGIES

SCAN STORE RETRIEVE INDEX INTEGRATE ARCHIVE

SOX is the Reason to Archive with Microfilm

Sarbanes-Oxley Act
Section 802

SEC. 802. CRIMINAL  PENALTIES FOR ALTERING DOCUMENTS.

(a) IN GENERAL- Chapter 73 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:`Sec. 1519. Destruction, alteration, or falsification of records in Federal investigations and bankruptcy. `Whoever knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object with the intent to impede, obstruct, or influence the investigation or proper administration of any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States or any case filed under title 11, or in relation to or contemplation of any such matter or case, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both.`Sec. 1520. Destruction of corporate audit records.

Most IT managers would tell us that the only way to archive your records is to back-up on tape or disk drives. When you consider the implications of lost data how long you (firm, office) are responsible to keep much of your corporate records, you’re chosen long term archival media system needs to be thoroughly evaluated.

Destruction, Alteration and Falsification

If you store legacy records on paper in files, how easy is it to miss-place a single page, replace an existing page with a new page or eliminate (destruction of some method – i.e. shredding) a file from a record completely.

 Corruptibility and Backwards Compatibility

While the idea of a digital back-up of your records seems safe enough, have you recently tried to open a CD or USB type media device that is 10 years old or older?

CD/DVDs are still vulnerable to data loss due to disease and damage. USB type portable devices can be corrupted during the importing/exporting process.

Technology continues to march forward at an ever quickening pace. Platforms are changing every 2-4 years which makes backwards compatibility very “iffy”. It’s not good business practice to assume that you can easily and reliably access back-up data on a disk-drive from as recent as 6 years ago.

Reliability of Tape Backups– A survey of IT executives on tape backup solutions reported these findings:

Gartner Group estimated that 10 to 50 percent of all tape restores fail. Storage Magazine and Gartner reported that 34% of surveyed companies never test a restore from tape, and of those that do test, 77% experienced tape backup failures.

  • 75% of respondents indicated that their companies suffered unrecoverable loss of corporate data they thought was successfully backed up to tape due to unreadable, lost or stolen media.
  • 63% said they encountered unreadable tapes when they tried to retrieve data with 76% of those cases reporting a direct impact to their business from loss of productivity to punishments for regulatory compliance infractions.

Every digital media is vulnerable to some type of corrupting influence. Anyone who has participated in a large conversion process from an older digital format to a more contemporary version knows the pitfalls. It is very likely that some (if not all) of the data will be corrupted and lost during the conversion process.  And data conversion is very costly.

Trusted Long Term Archival Platform

Archiving your business critical data to microfilm is still the most dependable and trustworthy solution for long term records storage. Altering a roll of film is difficult and obvious. Anyone can see if a roll of film has been spliced. The cost to archive a single image to film costs about $0.03 each and storing a roll of film costs about $1.50 per year.

A single roll of 16mm, 215’ microfilm can store more than 2 full bankers’ boxes of records. Properly filmed, processed and stored microfilm has a life expectancy (LE) of 500 years. And ultimately, you need only a flashlight to view the documents.

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